We Are Displaced

Many people think refugees should feel only two things: gratitude toward the countries that granted them asylum and relief to be safe. I don’t think most people understand the tangle of emotions that comes with leaving behind everything you know. They are not only fleeing violence—which is why so many are forced to leave, and is what’s shown on the news—but they are escaping their countries, their beloved homes. That seems to get lost in the conversation about refugees and internally displaced people. So much focus is on where they are now—not on what they have lost as a result.

We Are Displaced is the newest nonfiction book written by Malala Yousafzai for young readers.

The first half of the book tells the story of when her own family had to evacuate Swat Valley. They were internally displaced; they stayed with family in Shangla and were able to return home in three months.

The second half of the book tells the stories of ten girls and women from different countries in Africa, Asia, and Central and South America—how they left their countries, the camps they stayed in, their perilous journeys, and the new places they went. One of the accounts in the section is from the point of view of a white woman—one of the volunteers who welcomes one of the refugees when she and her family arrived in Pennsylvania. I was a little uncomfortable with the inclusion of this account. She seems like a wonderful person, but I’m not sure this was the right place for her story.

I’d like to read this again with my almost nine-year-old. I like that it mentions conflicts all over the world, and I’m hoping it can be a way to start conversations about conflicts that are happening in places that we don’t hear about so often, like Uganda and Colombia.

Let me know if you’ve read this or if you’re interested in picking it up!

Malala for the Whole Family

One child, one teacher, one book and one pen can change the world.
—Malala Yousafzai

Today I have books about Malala Yousafzai for the entire family. Malala is the Pakistani Nobel Peace Prize winner and champion for girls’ rights around the world who was shot by the Taliban in 2012 while on her way home from school. Her story is an empowering one that we can all benefit from, and it is one that we should be sharing with the young people in our lives, both boys and girls. Pictured above from left to right are her memoir for adults, for young adults, and for children, as well as a picture book. Detailed information about each appears below. Happy reading! View Post