A Race to Prayer by Aliya Vaughan

Our prayers literally saved us!

A Race to Prayer: Sulaiman’s Rewarding Day, by Aliya Vaughan, is an early chapter book for readers 7+. It has seven short chapters, and follows Sulaiman, who feels like every time he wants to do something fun, it’s either time to pray or it’s raining. When the rain keeps Sulaiman from going to play football, his dad offers to take him to the quad bike races. But things keep happening to get in the way. By the end of the book, Sulaiman is finally able to enjoy the races with his dad and grandpa, and he has learned a valuable lesson about the blessings of putting prayer first.  View Post

Thank you to Kube Publishing for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Finding Peace in the Holy Land: A British Muslim Memoir by Lauren Booth

51fKTHseQdL.jpg

Practising faith is like opening a door and realizing your life so far has been lived in a broom cupboard in the mansion of existence. Reality actually lies beyond and underneath the nuts and bolts, the brooms and cloths of the material world.

Finding Peace in the Holy Land is a memoir by Lauren Booth, who is probably best well-known as Tony Blair’s sister-in-law. Beginning with her hilarious upbringing, and moving through her life as an actress, a political activist, and then a journalist and humanitarian, it is ultimately the story of how she came to Islam.

Booth has a lovely sense of humor, and her writing is as spontaneous and vivacious as she herself is. Her sharp descriptions of the landscape in Palestine (“a building decorated in the local flavor; bullet holes”) and her narrative flair (“It was excellent advice. Advice I would completely ignore”) were a pleasure to read. View Post

She Wore Red Trainers by Na’ima B. Robert

414HSUuXdfL
I’m sorry to say that I did not get on at all with the very popular She Wore Red Trainers, by Na’ima B. Robert.
It’s a YA contemporary novel about Ali and Amirah, two Muslim teens living in South London. They each have “a past” but are both committed to practicing Islam the best way they can. The main plot is the romance between them; other topics are family issues and career choices.

View Post

Review—Communicating with Allah by Bassem Saeh

6130AMwKE1L._SX321_BO1,204,203,200_

Once upon a time, Bassem Saeh was asked to speak at an event about prayer (salah). When the time came, he rushed up to the podium and hurriedly read a few verses and a couple of hadeeth he had jotted down on a piece of paper, reading so quickly that his words ran together. He then turned and left. The audience was shocked and confused. After a moment, he returned to the podium and explained that his performance was no worse than the way that many of us pray. Rushing in, reciting without expression or understanding, and rushing off again.

Communicating with Allah: Rediscovering Prayer is Saeh’s answer to the problem of disconnecting from our distracting, modern lives and finding tranquility in our connection with Allah. Unique and powerful, this book breathes new life into an action that Muslims repeat constantly. If you are looking to worship smarter, a little bit of consistency in improving the quality of your five daily prayers will go a long way. View Post

Review—The Rohingya Crisis: A People Facing Extinction by Muhammad Abdul Bari

rohingya

A concise and informative history of the Rohingya, an evidence-based denunciation of Myanmar’s ethnic cleansing campaign, and an impassioned plea for recognition and human rights for the Rohingya. 

Before reading this book, I knew little more about the Rohingya than that something awful was happening to them and that it had to do with Myanmar, wherever that is. I should be ashamed of myself; I know.

Instead of relieving my shame, this book has increased it. I am ashamed of what some of humanity is capable of doing, and what the rest of humanity is content to allow to happen.

This 69-page book offers a concise and informative introduction to the ethnic cleansing of the Rohingya by the state of  Myanmar. Since August of last year, more than 10,000 Rohingya have been killed, and more than half a million people have fled across the border to Bangladesh. Even more disturbing than the scale of the crisis is the lack of awareness about it. View Post