Two Interfaith Books about Muslim-Jewish Friendships

Today I’m sharing two fantastic picture books about Muslim-Jewish relationships.
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A Moon for Moe and Mo is the story of two boys in New York City, one Jewish and one Muslim, who befriend each other at the grocery store as their mothers prepare for Rosh Hashanah and Ramadan. They discover just how much they have in common while sharing treats at the store. Later, each one thinks of the other as he gazes up at the moon and welcomes a holiday. A heart-warming story by Jane Breskin Zalben and gorgeous illustrations by Mehrdokht Amini (of Crescent Moons fame) make this a book that belongs on everyone’s shelf.

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Yaffa and Fatima Shalom, Salaam is the story of a Jewish and a Muslim woman who live and work side by side in the holy land. The story explores how their different faiths are similar, and how their commonalities—kindness and generosity—bring them together. It’s written by Fawzia Gilani-Williams, who is such a thoughtful and talented writer, and illustrated by Chiara Fedele.

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I highly recommend both of these beautiful books.

Let me know other interfaith children’s books you’ve found with Muslim characters.

A Moon for Moe and Mo Charlesbridge | Amazon

Yaffa and Fatima Shalom, Salaam Kar-Ben Publishing | Amazon

Yan’s Hajj by Fawzia Gilani and illustrated by Sophie Burrows

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Yan is a poor farmer who wants to go to hajj. But every time he saves up enough money and sets out, he meets someone in his path who needs his help.

He empties his money purse while on his journey three times, first to help repair a burned-down school, then to rescue a hurt and exploited boy, and finally, to build a mosque.  Each time, he simply goes back home and gets back to work to save more money. Eventually, he is old enough that he knows he won’t be able to save enough money again. But the good deeds he filled his life with have caught up with him, and the boy he rescued comes to take Yan to hajj. On this final journey, he sees the fruits of his labor: the school, the boy’s happy parents, and the mosque. View Post