My Favorite Ramadan Children’s Books

Alhamdulillah, we are living in a time where we have quite a few options for children’s books about Ramadan. Unfortunately, not all children’s books are created equal. In this list, I’m sharing some of my absolute favorite books about Ramadan for children 4–8.

The Jinni on the Roof

Written by Natasha Rafi

Illustrated by Abdul Malik Channa

It’s the story of Raza, who is too young to fast but wakes in the night to the smell of golden, flaky parathas being fried in the kitchen for the family’s pre-dawn meal. He just can’t wait, and he comes up with a clever and humorous way to get some parathas before the children’s breakfast. This really cute and heartwarming story is a favorite in my house, and it is the reason we stock parathas in my freezer every Ramadan. One of my favorite spreads shows how the sleeping house is filled with visiting relatives packed like sardines for Eid. It reminds me of my own childhood.

Find it here: Goodreads | Amazon.com


It’s Ramadan, Curious George

Written by Hena Khan

Illustrated by Mary O’Keefe Young

This board book is a simple but comprehensive introduction to Ramadan for young children and older ones, too. In it, our favorite curious monkey helps his friend Kareem prepare for and celebrate the month of Ramadan. I really love this one because it’s so powerful to see a familiar character that we know and love eating iftar, going to the mosque to do good deeds, and looking for the moon that marks Eid.

Find it here: Goodreads | Houghton MifflinAmazon.com | Book Depository


Ramadan Around the World

Written by Ndaa Hassan

Illustrated by Azra Momin

This picture book shows scenes of kids and families all over the world celebrating Ramadan. It not only showcases ethnic diversity but also shows children with autism, hearing impairments, and diabetes. The children fill sadaqah jars, play soccer, and gather at the mosque to pray and share food. There is kunafa, bubur lambak, and rooh afza. You’ll have to read if you don’t know what any of those are! I really love this book because it is a powerful demonstration of the ayah: “We have created you from male and female and made you peoples and tribes that you may know one another.”

Find it here: Goodreads | Ramadan Around the World


A Party in Ramadan

Written by Asma Mobin-Uddin

Illustrated by Laura Jacobsen

This picture books is the story of Leena, who is excited to fast on the day her Auntie Sana is coming to iftar. When Leena’s friend invites her to a birthday party on the same day, Leena’s mom tells her that it would be alright for her to fast a different day instead. But Leena thinks she can do both. Will she be able to? I love that this picture book tackles the realities of growing up as a religious minority. Leena holds tight to her faith, and the ending shows Leena’s family and her neighbors coming together in a way that showcases the beauty of Ramadan.

Find it here: Goodreads | Penguin Random House | Amazon.com | Book Depository


Lailah’s Lunchbox

Written by Reem Faruqi

Illustrated by Lea Lyon

Lailah is excited to be fasting Ramadan for the first time, and she puts away her school lunchbox for an entire month! Lailah’s mother writes a note for her teacher, but Lailah feels too nervous to give it to her. Lailah’s family moved from Abu Dhabi to Peachtree City last year, and she is worried what her classmates and teacher will say when they discover she is fasting. As lunchtime rolls around, Lailah can’t figure out what to do. Will she tell everyone she’s fasting? And how?

I love that this book tackles the struggle of going to school as a religious minority. In this empowering story, Lailah discovers that her teacher, librarian, and classmates are allies, and she owns her Muslim identity proudly.

Find it here: Goodreads | Tilbury House Publishers | Amazon.com | Book Depository

Yaseen’s Big Dream

Yaseen’s Big Dream is a cute picture book by Umm Juwayriyah describing the dreams of a young Black protagonist. At night, when he goes to sleep, he doesn’t just dream random dreams, but he dreams his wishes, hopes, and aspirations for the future.

He dreams that he is “a hero, a friend, a helper, a builder, the barber shop owner, and even the prayer leader at his masjid.”

One night, he dreams that he is the President of the United States for a day. As president, he feeds the homeless, tours schools to talk to kids, and plays (and wins) a game of celebrity basketball. And yes, of course Yaseen and his family pray the night prayers in the Oval Office.

This dream is the main plot of the book, and although the lack of a conflict left me feeling cheated out of a story, I like that this book shows a boy daring to dream to the furthest reaches of his imagination. He places himself in roles that are big and small but that all have one thing in common—service. He is an empowered and empowering character to share with our children, and I’d love to see more books (with actual plots) featuring his adventures in the future.

The writing is sweet and often lyrical. That made some redundancies, grammatical errors, and awkward phrasing extra annoying to me. I find that sort of thing unforgivable in a book that is meant to be read aloud over and over and that is meant for children who are learning to read. I also don’t want my children to learn that the Islamic products in our house are of a lower quality than mainstream secular products.

The illustrations, by Azra Momin, are soft, whimsical, and really lovely. They show Yaseen at work and asleep.

The message of this fun book is “dream big!”

Find it here: Goodreads | Djarabi Kitabs Publishing | Amazon.com

Thank you to Djarabi Kitabs Publishing for providing a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

The Tale of a Tiny Droplet

When I first saw this cute book, I thought it was about the water cycle. It’s actually not. It is the story of a tiny droplet living in a cloud. It sees a beautiful kingdom below on the ground, and it wants to live there. When it’s finally big enough to fall from the sky, it joins with a grain of sand in the air before falling into the ocean. It’s then taken in by an oyster and becomes a pearl. So, in fact, by the end of the story, it does get to fulfill its dream of living in the kingdom. It’s found by the Prince, who places it in a beautiful headdress for his mother, the Queen. View Post

Under My Hijab

Under My Hijabby Hena Khan and illustrated by Aaliya Jaleel, follows a young Muslim girl as she introduces readers to the powerhouse women in her life who wear a hijab.

In this picture book for readers 2–7, we see the narrator’s family members and friends at work and school in their hijabs and then at home without them. For example, her grandma is a baker, and “her hijab is carefully folded, like the crusts on my favorite pies.” We then see our narrator and her grandma baking cookies at home, where her grandma wears her hair in a bun. View Post

Big Red Lollipop

Big Red Lollipop is a picture book by Rukhsana Khan and illustrated by Sophie Blackall with one of my favorite things—casual Muslim representation. 

When Rubina is invited to her first birthday party, her mother (who doesn’t have any experience with American birthday parties) insists that Rubina takes her little sister, Sana, along with her. She is hesitant, but she has no choice. Needless to say, the party doesn’t go well. The rest of the story is about how the experience of that party eventually draws the sisters together. View Post